Personal Trainer Hobart

What does ‘Getting Fit’, actually mean?

One of the first questions we ask those who are new to Personal Best Fitness is “What would you like to achieve?” Often the response is “I want to get fit.” Sounds quite straight forward doesn’t it, but what does it actually mean? Getting fit means different things to different people. A common definition is, “To be physically fit means to be in a state of health and well-being. Physical fitness is defined as the body’s ability to function efficiently and effectively in work and leisure activities, to be healthy, to resist disease and to react to emergency situations. Helping a client “become fit” can take a variety of approaches and avenues and can be very different for ‘everybody and mind’.

There are 3 or 4 aspects of “Being Fit” that we may focus on with you at Personal Best:

  • Improving your cardiovascular/aerobic fitness/ huff and puff.
  • Help you increase your range of motion or flexibility.
  • Improve your strength.
  And we will program this in such a way that is functional to your needs. The aspects that we focus on will depend upon your goals and how your body is currently functioning. It is important to recognise that different approaches and focuses will result in different outcomes and will facilitate significant improvements in both your health and fitness. Cardiovascular fitness or endurance can be improved with exercise that is performed at a medium level, greater than 20 minutes in duration. This helps improve the health of your heart and lungs. Running, walking, rowing, swimming and bike riding are all activities that help enhance your cardiovascular or aerobic capacity. The formula used to decipher what your exercise training zone is 220 – age =? divided by 65% and 85%. Below are some examples for a 40 and 60-year-old who is looking to work at either training zone. If you are age 40 years a ‘starting’ exercise zone would be a heart rate of 117 beats per minute (bpm) and the high-end intensity would be 153bpm. If you are aged 60 years a ‘starting’ zone would be a rate of 104 bpm and a high-end zone would be 136bpm.  

When getting started at Personal Best your personal trainer will direct you to the appropriate zone for you, taking into consideration the following:

  • Your health
  • If you have done vigorous exercise recently
  • Any aches and pains that you may have
  • And what goals you have
These zones should be viewed as a guide and individual advice should be sort. Flexibility refers to the range of movement in a joint or series of joints, and length in muscles that cross the joints to induce a bending movement or motion. Flexibility varies between individuals, particularly in terms of differences in muscle length of multi-joint muscles. Some examples of multi joint muscles are the hamstrings, which cross both the hip and knee joints. Flexibility in some joints can improve their range of movement. Stretching being a common medium to maintain or improve this range of movement. Stretch receptors have two parts: Spindle cells and Golgi tendons. Spindle cells, located in the centre of a muscle, send messages for the muscle to contract. On the other hand, golgi tendon receptors are located near the end of a muscle fibre and send messages for the muscle to relax. As these receptors are trained through continual use, stretching becomes easier. When reflexes that inhibit flexibility are released joints are then able to have greater range of movement. There are a number of reasons why strength training is important. Some of these reasons are to maintain muscle tissue to protect your joints, build and maintain strong bones, control body fat, and decrease the risk of injury. Depending on what your goals are, your personal trainer will set your program accordingly.
  • If it is hypertrophy that you are after then 4 reps at 90% of your maximum load to 10 reps at 75% of your maximum load is required. Hypertrophy is a term for the growth and increase of the size of muscle cells.
  • If muscular endurance is what you are after approximately 15 to 20 reps at 70% is required. Muscular endurance is the ability of a muscle or group of muscles to sustain repeated contractions against a resistance for an extended period of time. Some of the activities that require muscular endurance are, sustained walking or running, cycling, swimming, circuit training, aerobics and of course resistance training.
Functional exercises train your muscles to work together and prepare them for daily tasks by simulating common movements you might do at home, work or in sports. For example, a squat is a functional exercise because it trains the muscles that you use when you stand up and sit down from a chair or pick up objects off the ground. When rehabilitating a client from injury, or building function back into their daily life, exercises are ‘regressed’ so that the client can move with confidence again and trust their bodies as they perform these movements. Understanding how the body moves is part of the rehabilitation process and the personal trainers at Personal Best are able to deliver this knowledge with skill and professionalism. Some of the exercises personal trainers prescribe their clients may be walking along a plank of wood on the ground heel to toe to improve balance, reaching up the wall with one hand while in a staggered stance, to improve posture. These types of exercises then lead to more complex forms of movement and with weights and or resistance. “Being fit” has so many different meanings. Ask the question, fit for what? Fit to wash the car, run a fun run, pick the grandkids up, play netball, or fit to walk 15000 steps each day on holidays. All of these things are important as long as they are gradually progressed and applied in an individual manner. Remember, not everything fits the same person and we all require different approaches. Your goals over time will evolve as you progress along the continuum that is your fitness. If you are unsure what is ‘best’ for you, ask us about booking a personal training session. Fran Sullivan Master Personal Trainer
Personal Trainer Hobart Food Christmas

12 Days of Christmas Tips

Throughout the year we work at keeping to routine, exercising regularly and making appropriate food choices.  During the festive season there are many temptations and we can ‘undone’ much of our years good work.  

Here are tips to help you ‘maintain your gains’ during the month of December.

 

1. Stay Active

Staying Active over the silly season is a great way to stay on top of your goals. Your body doesn’t know what time of year it is, so keep exercising, you will be happier and healthier for it.  

2. Keep Hydrated

In between the Christmas cheer make a deliberate attempt to drink water.Not only will this help to keep you hydrated but increase your ability to get the most out of your muscles during the next workout you do.  

3. Enjoy

Allow yourself to enjoy your Christmas lunch and or dinner. This shouldn’t be a stressful time for you if you are focused on weight loss.  Enjoy your food on Christmas Day, just don’t continue on the ‘merriness’ of it for days afterwards.  

4. To say ‘I don’t have time,’ is like saying, ‘I don’t want to.Lao Tzu.

Think for a moment about the things you domake time for… your health and quality of life can be scheduled in somewhere.  

5. Short Term Goals

Set yourself some. Make them SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timely.  

6. Plan Ahead

If you are travelling during the festive season, eat something before you go to avoid stopping for fast food. Take a bottle of water in the car with you so you can hydrate as you go.  

7. Set Realistic Plans

Make time for yourself. Cramping too much in can stress and drain you.  

8. Suggest Healthy alternatives as gifts

If someone asks you what they can buy you for Christmas, why not suggest a walk along the beach instead, a swim at the pool.  

9. This is OK

If you receive that box of chocolates, re-gift them…this is ok…or share them with your visitors.

10. Be Mindful

Eating for the sake of eating is something we do often. Especially in times of celebration.  Be mindful of the amount of food you are eating and when you are eating it.  Ask yourself . . . am I hungry?  

11. Book a Personal training session

Whether it be for a program up date to start the New Year or to ensure you do some exercise in the break. It is a great way to stay strong.  

12. “The best thing about time is that it comes one day at a time– Abraham Lincoln

We can achieve the most amazing goals if we take things a step at a time.   Fran Sullivan Master Personal Trainer

Facts on Losing Weight

Weight loss can be the bain of many people’s life.  Some of us go from diet to diet looking for a secret or an easy way for losing weight, the last 5 to 10 kg while others just bury their head in the sand. Ever since I can recall I have adopted a high carbohydrate/low fat/low GI and count your calories approach to helping my clients lose weight.  Over the past few years I have began to question this. For many this approach wasn’t successful, even following a calorie intake of 1200 to 1350 calories per day. For the few that this was successful for weight loss was extremely slow. After coming across a book titled Good Calories, Bad Calories. Published in 2007 which collates more than 150 years of research into nutrition and weight loss and suggests that it is the quality, not the quantity, of calories you consume that lead to weight gain and disease. The more carbohydrates you consume the fatter you will be. Carbohydrates, and particularly refined carbohydrates -like sugar and high fructose fruit and high fructose corn syrup -are the prime suspects in the chronic elevation of insulin; hence they are the ultimate cause of common weight gain/obesity. By stimulating insulin secretion, carbohydrates make us fat. By driving fat accumulation carbohydrates also increase hunger and decrease the amount of energy we expend in metabolism and physical activity. The fewer carbohydrates we consume the leaner we will be. What do you eat to help you lose weight? You replace the carbohydrates in your diet, and particularly the sugar, high fructose sources and starches, with fat and protein. That is because fat and protein have minimal effects on your insulin levels. Therefore you eat meat, fish, fowl, eggs, full fat dairy products, green leafy vegetables, nuts, minimal fruit and no grains or sugars.  The following description illustrates how carbohydrates impact the human body and the degree to which we need them or not.
  • 300 or more grams/day – Danger Zone! Easy to reach with the “normal” Australian diet, (cereals, pasta, rice. bread, muffins, soft drink, packaged snacks, sweets and desserts).  If this is your diet you are at high risk of excess fat storage, high inflammation and disease markers, metabolic syndrome and or diabetes.
  • 150 – 300 grams per day – Steady Weight Gain Your body will continue to produce high amounts of insulin, therefore preventing fat burning.  Generally your weight will increase by 1kg or more per year.
  • 100 – 150 grams per day – Maintenance Range Range based on body weight and activity level. When combined with exercise provides optimal body weight maintenance and increased energy levels through fat burning and muscle development. This is where you want to be when you have reached your ideal weight and are striving for optimal health.
  • 50 – 100 grams per day – Effortless Weight Loss Minimizes insulin production and significantly increases fat burning.  By consuming meat, fish, eggs, nuts, seeds, vegetables that grow out of the ground and some fruits you can loss 1kg of body fat per week and more importantly keep it off FOREVER.
If you would like to know more call us on 6234 5969. Amanda is considered a national expert in lifestyle coaching and personal training having 5 times been a finalist in the Australian Personal Trainer of the Year award.She is the founder of Personal Best Fitness, Tasmania’s Fitness Business of the Year and is recognized as a leader in corporate health programs.